Monthly Archives: November 2011

Al Jazeera English (“Al Jazeera”) and State Of Qatar (“Qatar”) accused of human rights abuses of people living with HIV

On the eve of World AIDS Day we are publicising an important case concerning vicious and humiliating human rights abuses on the basis of a person’s HIV status by a respected international media organisation, Al Jazeera. These violations are contrary to key principles of South Africa’s own response to HIV as well as well as the strategy of the leading United Nations body dealing with HIV; the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) aims to achieve zero discrimination by 2015.

Enquiries: Contact Nikki Stein on 011 356 4100 or stein@section27.org.za stein@section27.org.za

SECTION27 PRESS ALERT: Al Jazeera English and State of Qatar accused of human rights abuses of people living with HIV

• Al Jazeera English and State of Qatar accused of violating rights of South African journalist living with HIV
• South African delegation to International Labour Organization (ILO) requested to file complaint against State of Qatar

On the eve of World AIDS Day 2011, SECTION27 invites you to a media conference that will provide details about how international TV news channel, Al Jazeera English, acted in concert with its owner, the State of Qatar, to violate the rights of a senior South African journalist.

Date: Wednesday, 30 November 2011
Time: 14h00
Venue: SECTION27, 6th floor, Braamfontein Centre, 23 Jorissen Street, Braamfontein

High Court rules in favour of the Medicines Control Council


On 15 November 2011 the North Gauteng High Court in Pretoria ruled in favour of the Medicines Control Council (MCC) and others in a matter concerning Adcock Ingram’s resistance to the MCC’s decision to cancel the registration of drugs containing dextropropoxyphene (DPP). The MCC made the decision in April 2011 after coming to the conclusion that the drugs pose a danger to the public. Previously the state attorney, purporting to act on behalf of the MCC and others, entered into a settlement with Adcock Ingram that allowed the company to continue selling the drugs. This settlement was made an order of court. On 15 November 2011 the court set aside the settlement.

The case is important because it has resulted in the removal of products from the market that the MCC and other stringent drug regulatory authorities have deemed unsafe. Importantly, it reaffirms the MCC’s statutory and constitutional duties to protect public health by ensuring that medicines are safe and basing its decisions on the available evidence. The judgment rightly places the health and safety of the public over profits of the pharmaceutical company. company.