The AIDS Law Project ran at Wits to 2010 when it was amalgamated into the newly-formed SECTION27

+ Aids Law Project

Jali Commission enquiry into HIV/AIDS in Prisons, 2004

In prison, HIV/AIDS exacerbates existing problems and also creates new ones, yet the potential for far-reaching positive impact remains. Prisons are an intervention opportunity to reach a segment of the population, which is most likely to need government services related to HIV/AIDS and is also least likely to receive them through any other channel. Most people who end up in prison come from marginalised communities with limited access to health, education, and/or other sources of social welfare. For many of these people, their interaction with the criminal justice system will be their most extensive exposure to public services of any kind. Without an appropriate response to HIV/AIDS in prisons, the potential consequences will be increasingly tragic for both prisoners and the communities they represent.

Submission to Canada's Parliament on bill to amend the Patent Act and the Food and Drugs Act

The global AIDS epidemic is one of the greatest threats to security and development in the world. Millions of people in developing countries are dying of AIDS, TB and malaria – while the first world sits idly by. High prices of medicines, protected from competition by patent law, make it impossible for poor people to protect themselves against illness and death.

Health and Hope in Our Hands – 2004

Health and Hope in Our Hands: Addressing HIV and AIDS in the aftermath of rape and woman abuse.

This manual offers hands-on advice for service providers, health providers, traditional healers, counsellors and activists on how to deal with rape and sexual assault, as well as to provide a comprehensive package of care to rape survivors. It focuses on post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, and living with HIV/AIDS amongst other topics.