+ Access to medicines

Jali Commission enquiry into HIV/AIDS in Prisons, 2004

In prison, HIV/AIDS exacerbates existing problems and also creates new ones, yet the potential for far-reaching positive impact remains. Prisons are an intervention opportunity to reach a segment of the population, which is most likely to need government services related to HIV/AIDS and is also least likely to receive them through any other channel. Most people who end up in prison come from marginalised communities with limited access to health, education, and/or other sources of social welfare. For many of these people, their interaction with the criminal justice system will be their most extensive exposure to public services of any kind. Without an appropriate response to HIV/AIDS in prisons, the potential consequences will be increasingly tragic for both prisoners and the communities they represent.

Submission to Canada's Parliament on bill to amend the Patent Act and the Food and Drugs Act

The global AIDS epidemic is one of the greatest threats to security and development in the world. Millions of people in developing countries are dying of AIDS, TB and malaria – while the first world sits idly by. High prices of medicines, protected from competition by patent law, make it impossible for poor people to protect themselves against illness and death.

Medicines and Related Substances Amendment Bill, 2002

On 19 April 2001, the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers’ Association of South Africa (PMA) and numerous multinationalbrand-name pharmaceutical companies abandoned their legal challenge to the Medicines and Related Substances Control Amendment Act, 90 of 1997 (the Medicines AmendmentAct).

Regulation Relating to Communicable Diseases, 1999

On April 23rd 1999 the Minister of Health published draft Regulations to add Acquired Immune Deficiency (AIDS) and AIDS related deaths to the Schedule of Notifiable conditions. If these Regulations become law all health professionals1 will be required to: