Tuesday 28 May

We are hiring: Attorney

SECTION27 is a non-profit organisation that uses public interest law and advocacy to protect, promote and advance human rights and social justice. If you are passionate about human rights, self-motivated and would like to be part of a dynamic team working to challenge inequality and positively influence society, joining SECTION27 Continue Reading

We are hiring: Attorney

SECTION27 is a non-profit organisation that uses public interest law and advocacy to protect, promote and advance human rights and social justice. If you are passionate about human rights, self-motivated and would like to be part of a dynamic team working to challenge inequality and positively influence society, joining SECTION27 Continue Reading

SECTION27’s 2021 Year in Review

SECTION27’s Year in Review: 2021 Edition Learn more about SECTION27’s cases, campaigns and activities in the pursuit of social justice over 2021 2021 has been a jam-packed year for SECTION27. This review highlights the work of our education and health rights programmes in furthering human rights and working towards achieving social Continue Reading

Op-Ed: Wanted! Local Investors

First appeared on the Daily Maverick as “Wanted! Local investors in social justice” It is activists, clustered loosely under the rather meaningless term ‘civil society’, that provide intelligent, informed comment, counter-comment and critique of the actions of both government and the private sector. It’s time for South Africans to help them. By Continue Reading

SECTION27 Submission to Lotteries Board to Fund Social Justice Work

On 22 May 2012, SECTION27 responded to the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund (NLDTF) call for submissions to assist the NLDTF in developing its funding priorities. SECTION27 dealt with the NLDTF funding practices and priorities in the submission and recommended that social justice and human rights programmes be prioritised for funding by the NLDTF in the next funding period. SECTION27 made this submission because we believe that this work is critically important in a participatory democracy and because there are statutory and constitutional obligations to fund this work and ensure its sustainability.

This submission is endorsed by: AIDS Foundation of South Africa, Atlantic Philanthropies, Equal Education, ProBono.org, RAITH Foundation, Rural Health Advocacy Project and Sonke Gender Justice.

Read the complete submission by clicking “read more” below.

Continuing the activist dialogue

The politics of South Africa after the World Cup: Strategies for taking forward struggles for equality, dignity and social justice in South Africa

SECTION27 was launched at a conference of activists, legal professionals, and civil society organisations on May 6 – 7 2010. That conference began a discussion on the state of the Constitution, human rights and rule of law in South Africa, and the role that activists, lawyers, and civil society organisations should have in the continued struggle for the realisation of equality and dignity in South Africa.

In continuation of the discussions begun at that conference, SECTION27 hosted an activist dialogue – The Politics of South Africa after the World Cup: Strategies for Taking Forward Struggles for Equality, Dignity and Social Justice in South Africa – on 5 August 2010 to further discuss the links between current politics, the use of human rights law and the Constitution, and struggle.

Social justice organisations denounce the arrest of Sunday Times journalist, Mzilikazi wa Afrika

We are organisations that campaign for social justice. The success of our work is dependent on respect for the Constitution, especially the Bill of Rights. The right to free expression and freedom of the press and other media are essential components of democracy. That is why they are contained in the Bill of Rights. They are one of the essential means by which all people in South Africa, especially the vulnerable, exploited and poor, can hold government and the powerful private business sector to account.

Legal Service Charter, 2006

Apart from our obvious interest in this Charter as a provider of legal services, the AIDS Law Project has been centrally involved in broader efforts to expand access to justice. In February 2005, the ALP co-hosted a conference on improving access to legal services for people living with HIV.

WDA